Dolce Vita Bloggers: Culture Shock.

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Having Grandparents who are Italian, meant that we visited Italy for the first time when we were four. All of our Mum's side of the family still live there, so a few of our holidays growing up were spent visiting them all. We saw Sorrento, Positano, Praiano, Vettica, Padova and Venice all before we were 15. Pretty amazing right?

Looking back it's difficult to pin point any moments where we felt shocked by anything in Italy. Even with the language barrier we always had a family member to step in and make sure we didn't feel out of the loop. Food wise, we'd been devouring anything and everything our Nanna and Grandad had been cooking since we had teeth (maybe even before) so that wasn't anything to make us feel out of our depth either. Truth be told, with the cobbled streets, scenic views, jolly Italians and Aunties and Uncles who just wanted to squish us and never let us go, Italy has always felt very much like home.

But, this months Dolce Vita Bloggers topic is all about Culture Shock, so what are we are we going to write about? That's easy! We live in England and married Americans. We adore Italy and will always say we're half Italian - it's true to us since half of our family are in Italy. Each of these places has made us who we are today, but we often wonder where exactly certain traits come from. Sometimes our husbands would ask, "Do all British people do that?" and we'd think no, so why do we? Then on further thought we'd realize that whatever 'that' was, was our Italian side shining through. It made us think about all the other little things we do or the way we are in general that seem a little out of place in England and America.

Italian Traits!


We're always thinking about food.


Whenever we stayed over at Nanna and Grandads, we would always enjoy breakfast with Grandad while he was talking to us about what to make for lunch. We'd then tidy the table and proceed to make fresh pasta, ravioli or pizza ready for a lunch time feast. To this day we are always super prepared with food. If we leave the house on long trips we have to have lunch boxes and have prepared our lunch for work for the following day. It's also rare in England that we eat out, because we much prefer cooking and using what food we have in the house.

We talk loud.


People often say that when Italians get passionate they get loud. We'd definitely say we do this a lot. If we're happy, excited and really love something, we usually get told to lower the volume!


We talk with our hands.


We can not stay still while talking and always have to be doing something with our hands. It comes naturally to us and we just can't help it. Even when we sat on the couch chatting to Grandad he would still have space to make gestures and use his hands to explain something. 

We speak and/or see our family everyday.


Italians are very close to their familes. Nothing is more important. Families often build apartments on top of each other in Italy so that the next generation can live above them. While we live in our own houses and probably couldn't do that, now that we're home, we live just round the corner from our parents. When we lived in America we spoke to them and our sister every day. My husband (Kelly) sometimes found it odd that we always had to know what each other was doing or where we were going, but knowing that information is normal to us. We tell each other everything. 

We're worriers.


We saw a funny video once about a girl telling her Italian grandma that she was going swimming and the Grandma replied with a list of reasons why she shouldn't go: "It's too cold, You've just eaten..." etc. It had us crying because that is the story of our lives. Growing up our Mum would always be saying things like that if we wanted to go to the gym and if we so much as sneezed Nanna would worry that we were ill. As much as we try our hardest to stay positive and not always think worse case scenario first, we have to admit that they have definitely passed that worrier trait on to us.


What do you think? Do you have any traits that you feel are down to where you're from?

Thank you to Kelly, Jasmine and Kristie for another fun topic!


Have a great day!
Love



 



13 comments :

  1. Love this list girls! It's cool that you can pin-point certain traits to your heritage and can see what is Italian or British! :) Tania Michele xx

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    1. Thank you Tania! Glad you liked it! <3 xx

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  2. Oh I was so curious to see what angle you girls took and this and I love it! You definitely have those Italian traits. I think it's completely normal that you didn't have any "culture shock" when visiting Italy because you're Italian! By the way, I loved finding out that your husbands are American, I didn't know that! If either of you want to share your love story on Love Story Lunedì on my blog let me know, totally classifies as an international love story no?! Have a great summer!!! Thanks for joining us on this and for all the promo! Love, Jasmine of www.questadolcevita.com

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    1. Aww yay! Thank you Jasmine, glad you like it! :)
      That sounds fun, I would love to do that! Let me know what you need! :) Kelly xx

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  3. I love how you are proud of your heritage, Lucy and Kelly! Filipinos are similar to Italians in their love for food and the importance of family. <3 #DolceVitaBloggers

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    1. Thank you! It's definitely something we have grown a stronger love for each year! <3 It's lovely to find people with the same passion for family and food! :) xx

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  4. Oh yes, myself and my family all have those traits and I also share them with my extended Sicilian family!!

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    1. Glad you can relate! Thank you for reading! xx

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  5. Always thinking about food, YES!!!! �� I think that worrier trait is definitely strong because my mom has it too! A lot of my international students are perplexed by why American families usually aren't very close, as in the children leave home at 18, parents don't know where their adult children are doing, etc., so it was interesting that your American husband noticed that, Kelly! I definitely notice a big difference in closeness on my mom's Italian side vs. my dad's non-Italian side. I'm super close with my parents, and I wouldn't want it any other way! In fact, I can completely understand why you'd want to move back to the UK to be closer to family. I've already told my parents that when I officially move away from my hometown, they are coming with me! �� I'd love to hear more about how you met your husbands and other cultural differences you've observed while living in the US. Maybe you already have some posts on that?

    Thanks so much for joining #DolceVitaBloggers, it wouldn't be the same without you! <3

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    1. We see the difference between our Mum and Dad too Kelly! Although our Dad is very close with us, his side of the family aren't as close as Mum's side! Aww thats' cute, that's how we feel now. It's like if we're moving away, we're all going! :p I'll have a look and see what posts I can dig up, if some come to mind! :)

      Aww thank you! We love it!! <3 #dolcevitabloggers

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  6. I just noticed that I was writing "parents don't know where their children are" but changed mid sentence to "parents don't know what their children are doing" so it ended up a mash up of both lol

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  7. Loved your positive take on the topic! Ciao, Cristina

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